Premiere Pro CS5 and CS5.5 Digital Classroom Book with DVD

Premiere Pro CS5 and CS5.5 book
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Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 and CS5.5 Digital Classroom is like having a personal instructor guiding you through each lesson, while you work at your own pace. This Premiere Pro CS5 and CS5.5 book with DVD includes 11 self-paced lessons helping you learn essential skills and explore new features and capabilities of Adobe Premiere Pro.
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Lesson 6 Using Video Effects

You can apply effects to video clips on your Timeline, enhancing or correcting the video as necessary.

What you'll learn in this lesson:
  • Applying video effects to clips on the Timeline
  • Creating Masks on video footage
  • Applying Track Mattes to video clips to create custom transitions
  • Applying a color key to remove a green screen background

Starting up

In this lesson, you will work with the project files from the pr06lessons folder. Make sure that you have loaded the prlessons folder onto your hard drive from the supplied DVD. The Starting Up section at the start of this book provides detailed information about loading lesson files, resetting your workspace, locating missing media, and opening the files in CS5.5. If you have not already done so, please review these instructions before starting this lesson.

  • video
    See Lesson 6 in Action! Use the accompanying video to gain a better understanding of how to use some of the features shown in this lesson. The video tutorial for this lesson can be found on the included DVD.

What are video effects?

Video effects are processes you can apply to video clips on the Timeline. In Premiere Pro, effects are grouped into categories based on their use. There are two types of effects in Premiere Pro: fixed and standard.

Fixed effects are the pre-built effects automatically added to every clip on the Timeline. The fixed effects include: Motion, Opacity, Time Remapping, and Volume.

Standard effects add special qualities to your video, such as adjusted colors, blurriness, and noise. Premiere Pro includes several standard effects, but there are several third-party effects you can purchase from vendors such as Boris FX (www.borusfx.com), Digieffects (www.digieffects.com), and Synthetic Apperture (www.synthetic-ap.com).

Applying Video Effects

Effects are applied to clips on the Timeline instead of in between them, as is the case with transitions. All the video effects you can access in Premiere Pro are stored in the Effects panel, which is the library that contains all effects and transitions in the application. Effects are easy to apply: you locate the effect you want in the Effects panel using the search field or nested folder display and drag it to the clip you want in the Timeline. Once applied, you can edit effect properties in the Effect Controls panel when you select the clip in the Timeline.

Creating a Black & White effect

The Black & White effect de-saturates a color video clip and makes it appear as though it were shot in black-and-white. Since modern camcorders only record in color, this effect is useful when you want to simulate an old-fashioned look on modern footage, or create an artistic or dramatic effect.

In this part of the lesson, you will work with a pre-built Premiere Pro project and add the Black & White effect to a clip on the Timeline. The media for this section of the lesson is located in the video sub-folder of the Travelogue-New York folder inside of the Media Library folder.

1 From the Premiere Pro Welcome screen, click the Open Project button, or with Premiere Pro already open, chose File > Open Project. Navigate to the pr06lessons folder you copied to your hard drive and locate the pr0601.prproj file. Double-click the file to open it.

This project contains a sequence called Lake Scene. In this sequence, the video from the Central Park-NYC-Lake Scene.AVI has been placed on the Timeline and divided into two parts. You will apply the Black & White effect to the first clip on the Timeline.

  • Note
    The Central Park-NYC-Lake Scene.AVI clip on the Timeline was divided into two pieces using the Razor tool. After dividing the clip, the first part was dragged to the Video 2 track, and the Out Point of this clip was extended using the Selection tool to overlap the beginning of the second clip by 30 seconds.

2 The Effects panel is grouped with the Media Browser, Info, and History panels in the lower-left corner of the standard Editing workspace.

Click the Effects tab to make the panel active and visible.

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The Effects panel is the library for all the effects
and transitions available in Premiere Pro.

3 Type the word black in the search field at the top of the panel. This limits the content of the panel so only folder names, effects, and transitions that have the letters black in their names appear.

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The search field is helpful when finding specific
effects or transitions.

4 Click the Black & White effect in the Effects panel and drop it onto the video clip on the Video 2 track in the Timeline. The clip in your Program monitor is now black-and-white.

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You can apply effects and transitions by dragging them from the Effects panel and dropping them onto clips
in the Timeline.

5 Press the Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS) key on your keyboard to render all areas of the Timeline that need rendering.

When the rendering is done, Premiere Pro previews the Timeline automatically.

Notice that the black-and-white effect cuts out sharply when the clip ends; you will adjust this in the next part of the lesson by creating a transition from one clip to another.

6 Choose File > Save As. In the Save Project dialog box that appears, confirm that you are still in the pr06lessons folder, rename your file to pr0601-working.prproj, and click the Save button. Do not close this file; you will need it in the next part of the lesson.

Animating the opacity of clips

To create a natural, more aesthetically pleasing transition between the black-and-white clip and the color clip, you can have the black-and-white clip fade out and reveal the color clip. Opacity is one of the fixed effects available for all video clips that you can use to accomplish this.

In this section of the lesson, you will animate the Opacity effect of the clip that you added the Black & White effect to earlier in this lesson.

1 With the pr0601-working.prproj project still open, double-click the video clip on the Video 2 track to select it and open it in the Source monitor.

2 Click the Effect Controls panel tab next to the Source Monitor to make it active. The panel shows you all the Fixed and Standard effects currently applied to the selected clip. Notice that the panel is divided into two different areas. On the left you can see the effects and on the right you see a mini-Timeline view. This mini-Timeline view is used to animate effects.

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The Effect controls panel shows the effects of any clip selected in the Timeline panel.

3 Click the reveal triangle to the left of the Opacity effect to reveal the Opacity effect’s numerical value. This is where you will animate the clip’s opacity.

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The mini-Timeline display of the Effect Controls panel lets you animate effects.

4 In the Timeline panel, move the playhead to the 1-second (00;00;01;00) mark. Notice that the playhead in the mini-Timeline display of the Effects Controls panel also moves: both playheads are synchronized.

  • Note
    The clip on the Video 1 track begins at exactly the 1-second (00;00;01;00) mark on the Timeline. You can drag the playhead while holding the Shift key on your keyboard to force the playhead to snap to the beginning or end of the clips on your Timeline.

5 In the Effect Controls panel, notice that the Toggle Animation stopwatch to the left of the Opacity effect is already enabled. You can use this stopwatch to enable or disable animation.

Click the Add/Remove Keyframe button to the right of the Opacity effect to create a keyframe for the clip’s Opacity at the current position of the playhead.

This provides a beginning point for the animation you will create. The beginning point stores the clip’s Opacity at 100% (fully opaque).

The clip now has a red line above it on the Time Ruler that indicates it must be rendered to preview the effect at full quality.

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You set a clip’s opacity to any value between 100% (fully opaque) and 0% (fully transparent).

  • Note
    Keyframes are the basis for most computer-generated animation, and they store the property values of each effect. When you have two keyframes with different values, Premiere Pro automatically animates the change in value.

6 Hold the Shift key on your keyboard, and in the Timeline, drag the playhead to the end of the clip on Track 2.

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Notice that when you move the playhead in the Timeline, it also moves in the mini-Timeline display in the Effects Controls panel.

7 In the Effects Controls panel, change the value of the clip’s Opacity to 0 (zero). This adds a keyframe at the end of the clip where Opacity is 0. You now have a starting and ending value for the property that Premiere Pro can animate.

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Since the mini-Timeline view only shows the duration of the active clip, keyframes at the
beginning and end of the clip can be hard to see.

8 Press the Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS) key on your keyboard to render all areas of the Timeline that need rendering.

When the rendering is done, Premiere Pro previews the Timeline automatically. Notice that the Black & White clips fades out to reveal the full color one.

The contrast in the Black & White clip is weak; you will adjust this in the next part of the lesson.

9 Choose File > Save or press Control + S (Windows) or Command + S (Mac OS) to save these changes. Do not close the file; you will need it in the next part of the lesson.

Adjusting the tonality of clips

You can use the Levels effect to enhance the tonality of your image, which is useful when correcting footage that has a lighting aberration or low contrast, or to create a dramatic or artistic effect. For this exercise, notice that after applying the Black & White effect to the first park video clip, it now appears washed out and dull. The problem occurred because the video has a very limited tonal range, so the darkest areas are not very dark and the lightest areas are not very bright. The variation between the lightest and darkest areas of an image is called the contrast, and you can adjust it using video effects.

In this section of the lesson, you will add an effect to the black-and-white clip to adjust its tonal variation and create a greater amount of contrast.

1 With the pr0601-working.prproj project still open, type the word levels in the search field of the Effects panel to reveal two video effects: Auto Levels and Levels. You can use these effects to adjust the tonal variation of a video clip. The Levels effect lets you control the amount of tonal adjustment; the Auto Levels effect adjusts the video clip to meet a set base standard.

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The Effect panel’s search results become more refined
when you add more letters to the search term.

2 Drag the Levels effect from the Effects panel and drop it on the clip on the Video 2 track. The red bar that indicates the video clip should be rendered appears.

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When you apply an effect to a clip, it automatically becomes active so you can edit its properties in the
Effects Control panel.

  • Note
    Every time you add an effect to a clip or change the properties of an existing effect, you need to re-render the clips to see the results of your effect at full quality.

3 Move the playhead to the 15-frame (00;00;00;15) mark on the Timeline panel so you can see the black-and-white clip in the Program monitor. This is an optional step that will let you see the results of the Levels effect in the monitor as you adjust its properties. Note that just applying the effect produces no results. The default Levels settings are quite neutral. In the next step, you will adjust the property values to enhance the video image.

4 In the Effect Controls panel, click the reveal triangle to the left of the Levels effect to see all the properties of the effect that you can edit and animate. You might not be able to read the property names because of a lack of space caused by the mini-Timeline displayed on the right of the panel.

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Some effects, such as Black & White, don’t have any properties to edit, but most offer a wide
range of editable attributes.

5 Click the Show/Hide Timeline View to collapse the Timeline display and expand the property display to the full size of the Effect Controls panel. Now the full property names are visible.

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You can collapse the Timeline view to provide a larger area to edit effect properties.

Controlling tonal variation with levels

In Premiere Pro, the Levels effect doesn’t have graphs and sliders to control it as image editing applications such as Adobe Photoshop do. Instead, the Levels effect is controlled through numerical fields. This effect is used to regulate the contrast of a video clip by adjusting the black-and-white input and output levels and gamma of the clip. Changing the black or white input levels increases the amount of dark and light areas in the video, which increases the video’s contrast. Changing the black or white output levels of a video clip reduces the dark and light areas of an image, reducing its contrast. If you overly reduce the output levels of an image, your result is a solid gray color. The gamma of a clip is its overall brightness value; adjusting it makes the mid-tone areas of an image darker or lighter.

You can use the Levels effect to adjust the composite image or any of the three individual color channels in the video clip. This allows you to edit the black-and-white input and output levels and the gamma of the Red, Green, and Blue color channels individually. Each of the properties that appear under the Levels effect has a Toggle Animation stopwatch. You can animate almost every effect property in much the same way as you animated the Opacity effect earlier in this lesson.

6 Change the value for the (RGB) Black Input Level to 20, and then change the value of the (RGB) White Input Level to 240. Adjusting the Input Levels of Black & White change the minimum value for which pixels are black in the image. These new values will effectively increase the range of pixels that are assigned to Black and White in this clip. With a wider range of pixel value assigned to black-and-white, the contrast, which is the variation between the dark and light areas of the image is enhanced.

Click the fx button to the left of the Level effect to disable the effect. Do this a few times so you can compare the change effects on the clip’s Levels.

Make sure you turn the effect back on before you advance to the next step in this lesson.

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You can toggle effects on and off to easily compare and contrast the effects of your enhancements.

7 Press the Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS) key on your keyboard to render all areas of the Timeline that need rendering.

When the rendering is done, the application previews the Timeline automatically. Notice that the contrast of the black-and-white clip is much stronger now.

8 Choose File > Save or press Control + S (Windows) or Command + S (Mac OS) to save these changes to your project. You can close this file; you have completed this section of the lesson.

Working with track mattes

Track Mattes, or Traveling mattes, is a technique used to hide or reveal specific areas of a video clip. This effect is achieved by using another video clip as the source of the track matte. You can use the source clip’s alpha or luminance to identify the parts of the target clip that are visible. Alpha is the technical name for transparency; luminance is a measure of brightness of a video image.

A video clip or still image of text, or text created using the Titler, is a common source for track mattes. This technique, called clipping masks in programs such as Photoshop and Illustrator, allows the video or still image text clip to mask the layer below it so you can see an image or video inside the text shape. You can animate track matte sources by adding keyframes for any of the layer’s fixed Motion effects.

Preparing the clip for a Track Matte

In this part of the lesson, you will use a 3-second (00;00;03;00) animation of the screen image transitioning from solid white to solid black. You will use this video clip to create a custom transition at the end of the clip on the Video 2 track using the Track Matte Key effect. Since the clip you will use as the source for the effect is only three seconds long, you can’t use it on a clip longer than the target video. To fix this problem, you will split the Central Park-NYC-Fountain Scene.AVI so the final three seconds, the section that overlaps the Central Park-NYC-Lake Scene. AVI, form a separate clip. You will then apply the effect to this new split clip. You must prepare the clip this way so the rest of the clip does not become transparent.

The media used in this portion of the lesson can all be found in the Media Library folder. The video (Central Park-NYC-Fountain Scene.AVI & Central Park-NYC-Lake Scene.AVI) used is located in the video sub-folder of the Travelogue-New York media folder. The QuickTime file (Animated Track Matte.mov) used as the track matte here is located in the Graphics folder.

The media used in this portion of the lesson can all be found in the Media Library folder. The video (Central Park-NYC-Fountain Scene.AVI and Central Park-NYC-Lake Scene.AVI) used is located in the video sub-folder of the Travelogue-New York media folder. The QuickTime file (Animated Track Matte.mov) used as the track matte here is located in the Graphics folder.

1 From the Premiere Pro Welcome screen, click the Open Project button, or with Premiere Pro already open, chose File > Open Project. Navigate to the pr06lessons folder that you copied to your hard drive and locate the pr0602.prproj file. Double-click the file to open it.

This file contains a single sequence called Applying a Track Matte.

2 In the Timeline panel, ensure the Video 1 and Video 2 tracks are active (highlighted light gray) and move the playhead to the beginning of the Central Park-NYC-Lake Scene.AVI clip at the 15-second and 22-frames (00;00;15;22) mark.

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You can click a track to toggle it to active or inactive; active tracks appear with a light gray highlight
on the track header.

  • Note

    You can move the playhead to the beginning of the clip in several ways:

    • Type the destination time code in the Current Time text field in the upper-left corner of the Timeline panel.
    • By dragging the playhead towards the clip while holding the Shift key on your keyboard so it snaps to the beginning and end of each clip.
    • By pressing the Page Down key on your extended keyboard, you limit the playhead from one edit line to the next. The edit lines are the points where one clip ends and the next begins. The playhead must be on a track that’s currently active so it can stop at a clip’s edit line. Active tracks appear highlighted light gray; clicking a track toggles it from active to inactive.

3 Click the Central Park-NYC-Fountain Scene.AVI on the Video 2 track to make it active and choose Sequence > Razor Tracks to cut the clip at the current position of the playhead.

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The keyboard shortcut to split a clip is Control + K (Windows) or Command + K (Mac OS).

  • Note
    You can use the Razor Tool ( 1994.jpg ) to cut the clip instead of the Razor Tracks command.

4 Choose File > Save As. In the Save Project dialog box that appears, confirm that you are still in the Lesson 6 folder, rename your file to pr0602-working.prproj, and click the Save button. Do not close this file; you will need it in the next part of the lesson.

Now that you have separated the clip into two individual clips, the second clip is ready to receive the Track Matte Key effect, which you will add in the next part of this lesson.

Applying and editing the Track Matte Key effect

The Track Matte effect is added to the clip on your Timeline that you want as the target. You must place the source clip in a video track above it, and it should contain an alpha channel or be a high contrast image if you want to use its luminance value for the effect. In this portion of the lesson, you will work with a video file that is a high contrast black-and-white animation created in Photoshop and exported as a video file.

1 With the 0602-working.prproj project still open, double-click the Animated Track Matte.mov in the Video folder of the Project panel to open it in the Source Monitor.

Preview the video by clicking the Play/Stop Toggle button in the Transport controls. Notice that this animation transitions from fully white to black when a series of black squares appear on screen in sequence over a 3-second (00;00;03;00) period. This will be the basis for the custom transition you will create using the Track Matte Key effect.

2 Click the Animated Track Matte.mov in the Project panel and drag it to the Video 3 track. Place it above the second clip on the Video 2 track. It will snap to the beginning of the playhead when you drag it into position

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The Program Monitor turns white when the animation is placed on top of the video clip.

3 In the Effects panel, type the word track in the search field. The Track Matte Key effect appears in the Keying folder.

Drag the effect to the second Central Park-NYC-Fountain Scene.AVI clip on the Video 2 track.

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If you don’t use the search field, you can find the Track Matte Key by going to
Video Effects > Keying > Track Matte Key in the Effects panel.

4 Click the Effect Controls panel tab to make it active and visible. Since the second Central Park-NYC-Fountain Scene.AVI clip was automatically selected when you applied the Track Matte Key effect to it, this clip’s effects are listed in the panel.

Click the Show/Hide Timeline view button to hide the mini-Timeline, and then click the reveal triangle to the left of the Track Matte Key effect to see its properties.

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You have to double-click a clip to open it in the Source Monitor, but you only need to
single-click on a clip to view its effects in the Effect Controls panel.

5 Change the Matte property to Video 3; this is where the animation you want to use as the source of the effect is located.

Change the Composite Using property to Matte Luma. Since this video file does not contain any transparent areas, the default Matte Alpha setting for this property will not produce a result.

6 Press the Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS) key on your keyboard to render all areas of the Timeline that need rendering.

When the rendering is done, the application previews the Timeline automatically.

The block animation has now become the transition between the two video clips.

7 Choose File > Save or press Control + S (Windows) or Command + S (Mac OS) to save these changes to your project. Close this file; you have completed this section of the lesson.

Using the Ultra Keyer

Chroma keying lets you composite two images together by removing a specific color from one of the images. You can use chroma keying when you shoot video of your subject in front of a blue or green screen and then replace the screen color with a different background. Some examples of using this technique, also called color keying, blue screening, or green screening, is weather reporting on television and films that use virtual backgrounds and set extensions.

Adobe Premiere Pro includes several standard effects used for keying video footage; you used one of these when you created a track matte. The Ultra Key effect combines several different keying effects into one and provides a single point of control for many keying tasks.

The Ultra Key Effect properties

Transparency: Sets the amount of transparency of the source footage. A value of 100 is fully transparent; a value of 0 is fully opaque.

Highlight: Sets the opacity of lightest areas of the source video footage. You can adjust this property to enhance the transparency of a color screen that lacks a single consistent tone. The available values of this property range from 0 to 100, with a default value of 50. A value of 0 has no effect on the source video.

Shadow: Sets the opacity of dark areas of the source video footage. Use this property to adjust the transparency of a dark element that has become transparent. The available values of this property range from 0 to 100, with a default value of 50. A value of 0 has no effect on the source video.

Tolerance: Filters out colors that have seeped into the foreground area from the background, such as those caused by color spill. Increase the tolerance to allow for a greater amount of variation from the chosen key color. The available values of this property range from 0 to 100, with a default value of 50. A value of 0 has no effect on the source video.

Pedestal: Filters out noise in a grainy image. Noise is often caused in video footage because of low light conditions. The available values of this property range from 0 to 100, with a default value of 10. A value of 0 has no effect on the source video.

Choke: Shrinks the size of the alpha channel matte created by the color key effect by tightening or contracting the matte following the contours of your foreground subject. The available values of this property range from 0 to 100, with a default value of 0.

Soften: Softens or blurs the edge of the alpha channel matte created by the color key process using a box blur filter (fractional kernel size). The available values of this property range from 0 to 100, with a default value of 0.

Contrast: Adjusts the contrast: the variation between the lightest and darkest areas along the edge of the matte. The available values of this property range from 0 to 100, with a default value of 0.

Mid Point: Sets the mid-point for the contrast property. The available values of this property range from 0 to 100, with a default value of 50.

Spill Suppression

Desaturate: Sets the saturation of the background color. Use this property to desaturate colors close to being fully transparent; for example, the color fringe at the edge of a foreground subject caused by a background color cast. The available values of this property range from 0 to 100, with a default value of 25.

Range: Sets the amount of color spill that is desaturated. The available values of this property range from 0 to 100, with a default value of 50.

Spill: Adjusts the amount of spill compensation. The available values of this property range from 0 to 100, with a default value of 50.

Luma: Restores the original luminance values of the source footage using the alpha channel created by the keying effect. The available values of this property range from 0 to 100, with a default value of 50.

Color Correction

Saturation: Sets the saturation: the intensity of the color values of the foreground subjects in the source video footage. The available values of this property range from 0 to 100, with a default value of 100.

Hue: Sets the hue: the color values of the foreground subjects in the source video. The available values of this property range from –180° to +180 ° with a default value of 0°.

Luminance: Sets the luminance or brightness of the foreground subjects in the source video. The available values of this property range from 0 to 200, where 0 is black and 100 is 4x the base luminance value. The default value of this property is 100.

Creating a garbage matte

The first step in the chroma keying process is to create a garbage matte to isolate the subject and the area immediately around it. A garbage matte is created quickly and doesn’t need to be precise. It is usually just a rough shape that removes any extraneous areas of the video frame. When using a green screen, the important area is the one around your subject, especially if they are moving. You will often see parts of the set, such as a light stand, or the frame holding the screen at the edges of the video image; use the garbage matte to remove these areas.

There are three types of garbage mattes you can create in Premiere Pro, which are differentiated by the number of anchor points each has. Use the 4, 8, and 16 point Garbage Mattes to quickly mask the unimportant areas of a video image.

1 From the Premiere Pro Welcome screen, click the Open Project button, or with Premiere Pro already open, chose File > Open Project. Navigate to the pr06lessons folder you copied to your hard drive and locate the pr0603.prproj file. Double-click the file to open it.

This file contains a single sequence called Using the Ultra Keyer. There are two movie clips within this sequence: Central Park-Laura Walking.mpeg on the Video 1 track, and Jeff Jacobs-Greenscreen CloseUp.mpeg is above it on the Video 2 track.

2 In the Effects panel, type the word matte in the search field at the top of the panel and locate the Four-Point Garbage Matte effect.

Drag the effect to the Jeff Jacobs-Greenscreen CloseUp.mpeg clip on the Video 2 track.

3 Click the Effect Controls panel to reveal it and make it active. The properties of the effect applied to the Jeff Jacobs-Greenscreen CloseUp.mpeg clip are visible in the panel.

Click the Show/Hide Timeline view button to hide the mini-Timeline.

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Adding an effect to a clip automatically selects that clip so its properties are immediately
accessible in the Effect Controls panel.

4 In the Effect Controls panel, click the effect called Four-Point Garbage Matte to reveal the matte’s control points in the Program Monitor.

Click on the reveal triangle to the left of the Four-Point Garbage Matte effect to view its properties. The matte has a property to set each of the corner’s control point. Each property has two values: the X (Horizontal) position and the Y (Vertical) position. In the Effect Controls panel display, the first value for each control points property is it’s X position while the second value is the point’s Y position. The idea behind using a garbage matte is to limit the area that the keyer will have to calculate without accidentally removing any part of your subject.

By default, the Four-Point Garbage Matte’s control points are positioned at the corners of your clip. Make the following changes to the Properties:

Top Left: Change the value of the X position (the first value) to 655 and leave the second value as is.

Top Right: Leave this property as is.

Bottom Right: Leave this property as is.

Bottom Left: Change the value of the X position (the first value) to 105 and leave the second value as is.

A portion of the background clip is now visible because you moved the garbage matte’s corner points. Since the subject (the guy singing, Jeff Jacobs) moves constantly, make sure the matte is not too close to him to avoid removing a part of his body.

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The garbage matte need not be perfect since its purpose is to remove extraneous areas.

5 Choose File > Save As. In the Save Project dialog box that appears, confirm that you are still in the Lesson 6 folder, rename your file to pr0603-working.prproj, and click the Save button. Do not close this file; you will need it in the next part of the lesson.

Now that the garbage matte is in place, you can apply the Ultra Key effect to the clip.

Applying the Ultra Key

The Ultra Key effect contains a series of effects to generate color keys quickly and efficiently. All the tools that you need to generate the alpha (transparency) matte by removing the background green color, adjust the edges of the matte to eliminate color spill from the background and even color correct the foreground footage itself are all located in a single location.

1 With the 0603-working.prproj project still open, type the word ultra in the search field at the top of the Effects panel to reveal the Ultra Key.

  • Note
    You do not need to capitalize words when using the panel search field.

2 Drag the Ultra Key effect to the Jeff Jacobs-Greenscreen CloseUp.mpeg clip on the Video 2 track.

3 Click the Effect Controls panel to reveal it and make it active. The properties of the effect you applied to the Jeff Jacobs-Greenscreen CloseUp.mpeg clip are visible in the panel.

Click the Show/Hide Timeline view button to hide the mini-Timeline, and then click the reveal triangle to the left of the Ultra Key effect to see its properties.

4 Click the Key Color eyedropper to activate it, and then click the slightly darker green area to the left of the subject’s shoulder. The green background is removed, making the background video visible.

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The Ultra Key effect removes areas of an image that match the selected Key Color.

5 The area where the Ultra Key effect removes the green screen appears whiter than the area revealed by the garbage matte because the screen wasn’t a single continuous tone; it had some darker and lighter areas. The lighter areas are still opaque, causing the overlay effect.

Click the reveal triangle to the left of the Matte Generation group to view the properties contained there.

Change the value of the Pedestal property to 49 to remove the remaining white overlay.

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The Ultra Key is sometimes a one-click solution; in this case, you had to adjust it to produce optimal results.

6 Click the reveal triangle to the left of the Matte Cleanup property group. Change the value of the Choke property to 9 and the value for Soften to 17.

This completes the adjustments to the effect.

  • Note
    You can animate almost every property in the Ultra Key effect.

7 Press the Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS) key on your keyboard to render all areas of the Timeline that need rendering. The process could be long because of the complexity of the Ultra Key effect.

When the rendering is done, the application previews the Timeline automatically.

The green screen has been completely removed by the effect.

8 Choose File > Save or press Control + S (Windows) or Command + S (Mac OS) to save these changes to your project. You can close this file; you have completed this section of the lesson.

Self study

1 Using your own footage or the footage provided with this book, experiment with the different effects in the application and see how they can be used to enhance or alter your footage.

Just a thought about working with green or blue screens. While commercial green screens can be a bit expensive, there are ways to mitigate the costs. To make budget video shoots work filmmakers have been known to use regular fabric stretched on a rack or paint a wall with green or blue house paint and even colored poster board can be used to create quick, portable and cheap green screens. Remember, that with today’s sophisticated software, your screens don’t have to be the exact chroma key green or blue colors to be effective.

Review

Questions

1 What are the two types of effects that you have access to in Premiere Pro, and how do they differ?

2 What is the purpose of a Track Matte and what two properties of a source video can be used to create one?

3 What is chroma keying and what is it used for?

Answers

1 The two types of effects available in Premiere Pro are Fixed Effects and Standard Effects. Fixed effects are the pre-built effects automatically added to every clip on the Timeline. The fixed effects include Motion, Opacity, Time Remapping, and Volume. Standard effects are used to add special qualities to your video, such as adjusted colors, blurriness, or noise. The Premiere Pro application includes several standard effects you can use.

2 Track Mattes, also called Traveling mattes, is a technique used to hide or reveal specific areas of a video clip. You can make a track matte based on the source clip’s alpha (transparency) or luma (brightness) channels.

3 Chroma keying is a technique used in film and television that lets you composite two images together by removing a specific color from one of them. Chroma keying is used most often when you shoot video of your subject in front of a blue or green screen and then replace the screen color with a different background image or video.

Congratulations! You have finished Lesson 6, “Using Video Effects.”

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Other Books from the Digital Classroom Series
  • Photoshop CS6 book
  • Dreamweaver CS6 book
  • Creative Suite 6 book
  • Flash Professional CS6
  • InDesign CS6 book